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Education

Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

The Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) is a plan or program developed to ensure that a child who has a disability identified under the law and is attending an elementary or secondary educational institution receives specialized instruction and related services.

https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/special-services/ieps/understanding-individualized-education-programs


504 Plan

A 504 plan is a blueprint for how the school will provide supports and remove barriers for a student with a disability, so the student has equal access to the general education curriculum.
https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/special-services/504-plan/understanding-504-plans


IEP Meetings

If your child has an Individualized Education Program (IEP), you and the rest of his IEP team will meet at least once a year to sit down together and make sure the IEP meets your child’s needs. The IEP needs to be revised as your child makes progress and faces new challenges, and as new instruction techniques and technology become available.
https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/special-services/ieps/the-iep-meeting-an-overview

Your child’s next IEP meeting is scheduled. So how can you prepare for it? Use this collection of downloadable tips, tools and checklists to get organized.
https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/special-services/ieps/iep-boot-camp-getting-ready-for-your-childs-iep-meeting

This webinar will define and empower families in their role as a true leader with the IEP team and IEP meetings. Tips and tools will be shared about setting an agenda, staying on task and getting the IEP to truly reflect the goals and objectives for your child through good communication.
Use the following link to view this webinar: http://cc.readytalk.com/play?id=f9f2v8

As a parent, do you approach IEP meetings with fear and dread? If so, here are some suggestions to help you feel more at ease and able to participate as a full member of the team that plans your child’s special education program.
https://www.greatschools.org/gk/articles/tips-for-a-successful-iep-meeting/


Inclusion

Inclusive education happens when children with and without disabilities participate and learn together in the same classes. Research shows that when a child with disabilities attends classes alongside peers who do not have disabilities, good things happen.
http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/learning-disabilities/inclusive-education/

Across the globe, students with disabilities are increasingly educated alongside their nondisabled peers in a practice known as inclusion. Inclusion is prominently featured in a number of international declarations, national laws, and education policies.
https://alana.org.br/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/A_Summary_of_the_evidence_on_inclusive_education.pdf


Parent Rights

Special education services can be helpful to children with disabilities. When misunderstandings or problems arise about how to make the special education services work for you and your child, the parental rights notice is one place to start.  The notice addresses key rights such as providing informed consent and procedures for disagreeing with the district.
https://education.mn.gov/MDE/fam/sped/rights/


Communication Tools

Daily communication between the school and parent is a key factor in a child’s academic success. 
Here is a sample template:
Communication Log